The American Nurses Association Breathes New Life Into The Nursing Code of Ethics For 2015

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On a daily basis, the average nurse uses knowledge, training and ethical standards to make vital decisions regarding patient health. Nurses are required to quickly process simple and complex emergency situations, which leaves little room for second guessing. So, to help guide those in the profession, the American Nurses Association (ANA) created a Code of Ethics.

This Code is the structure that provides foundational standards and offers guidance to practicing nurses for various situations. It also sets the standards against which nursing performance can be judged. For the first time since 2001, the ANA has revised the Nursing Code of Ethics. The revised Code was released to the public on January 1, 2015.

 

Why Now?

The revised version of the Nursing Code of Ethics is geared to help nurses in a more modern practice environment. It addresses some of the more current issues, including confidentiality issues raised by social media, treatment for end-of-life care and the integration of social justice into health care policy as a whole. These guidelines need to be updated as conditions and society changes, and health care advances and presents new problems.

 

What Changes Were Made?

Provisions 1-3: These contain newly established guidelines on advocating for the                                    patient, family and community, along with the need to exercise                                        kindness and respect in all professional relationships.

Provisions 4-6: Contains new guidelines on delivering and maintaining competent care                            that includes self-respect and self-care, accountability, and                                              responsibility to continue learning and growing personally and                                          professionally.

Provisions 7-9: Sets forth broader health issues in the community and on a national                                and international level, along with the advancement of professional                                  values, social policy and education.

 

The Nursing Code of Ethics is a reflection of the proud ethical heritage of nursing and serves as a guide and promise to society for all nurses now and into the future.

To view the complete revised Nursing Code of Ethics, click here.

ANA

Click here to find out more information on the American Nurses Association’s 2015 Year of Ethics

 

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the updates made to the code of ethics? Do you think it will help nurses identify components of real-world problems and analyze the situation effectively? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.
Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Sources:

Howard, Cynthia. “2015: The Year of Nursing Ethics.” Nurse Together. (February 5, 2015). From: http://www.nursetogether.com/2015-the-year-of-nursing-ethics

Northeast Ohio Media Group Marketing Staff. “Year of Ethics Offers Nurses Guidance and Support Regarding Moral Decisions.” Cleveland.com. (April 15, 2015). From: http://blog.cleveland.com/university_hospitals_health_system_inc/2015/04/year_of_ethics_offers_nurses_g.html

American Nurses Association. “Code of Ethics for Nurses With Interpretive Statements.” (May 1, 2015). From: http://www.nursingworld.org/Mobile/Code-of-Ethics

 

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1999-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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Crack Down on Unlicensed Practice of Nursing by Florida Department of Health

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida in Health Law

The Florida Department of Health (DOH) recently made a presentation regarding its increased investigation and prosecution of the unlicensed practice of nursing and other health professions. More resources and more investigators are being assigned to this duty.

The Department of Health has more than doubled the investigators in the Unlicensed Activity Unit from seven investigators to nineteen recently. This dramatic increase in resources and staff has resulted in the investigation of more complaints than ever regarding unlicensed practice of nursing.


Weapon of Choice in This Battle: Trust Funds.

Florida has a dedicated trust fund to combat unlicensed nursing and medical activity. Each nurse or other licensed health professional pays a $5.00 fee at initial licensure and each licensure renewal. These funds are deposited into Florida’s Medical Quality Assurance (MQA) Trust Fund. Each board is then consulted regarding enforcement methods and strategies to increase awareness about unlicensed activity. The Board of Nursing is routinely consulted by MQA on this issue.


Public Service Announcements.

The DOH has produced several short videos to inform the public of unlicensed activity. These public service announcement videos are currently being run as movie previews in theaters throughout South Florida. South Florida, as the most densely populated region in the state, higher rates of unlicensed activity than other parts of Florida.


Tips to Avoid Unlicensed Practice of Nursing Charges.

Here are some tips you can use to avoid charges of unlicensed practice of nursing or of aiding and abetting the unlicensed practice of nursing:

1. If you are not licensed as a nurse in the state of Florida and you are working in Florida, do not call yourself a nurse. This by itself violates the law.

2. It does not matter if you are licensed as a nurse in another state or another country. If you are not licensed in Florida, you may not legally refer to yourself as a nurse here.

3. Wear a name tag that identifies you as “Medical Assistant,” “Doctor’s Assistant,” “Phlebotomist,” “Clinic Staff,” or title other than a nurse if you are not a licensed nurse in Florida.

4. If a patient or your own staff incorrectly refers to you as a “nurse,” correct them and advise them that you are not licensed in the state of Florida or that you are not a nurse, but a medical assistant.

5. If you are a doctor, clinic administrator, or office manager, never refer to a medical assistant, certified nursing assistant (CNA) or other unlicensed person as a “nurse” or “the nurse.”

6. Be sure none of your business cards, resume, letterhead or correspondence refers to you as a nurse, R.N., or L.P.N., unless you are actually licensed in the state.

We have been required to provide legal advice and representation to many different individuals because of situations like those above.


Word to the Wise.

The DOH’s Bureau of Enforcement is cracking down on unlicensed activity. It is highly likely that if you are practicing a health profession without a license, any complaint about you will be investigated. Practicing a health care profession without a license is a criminal offense. Penalties include arrest by law enforcement, fines, and the issuance of a cease and desist order.

To view the DOH Unlicensed Activity Program website, click here.


Comments?

Do you think the that merely referring to a person as a “nurse” should be grounds to prosecute him or her? How about referring to a person as a “doctor” or “doc?” If so, “what’s up, doc?” Please leave any thoughtful comments below.


Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys
.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents nurses, physicians, pharmacists, pharmacies, optometrists, and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, NPDB actions, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.


About the Author:
About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1999-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.
George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in the Legal Specialty of Health Law

Join Us for Florida Laws and the Nurse: New Licensure Requirement

Join Joanne Kenna nurse attorney with The Health Law Firm and the Greater Orlando Chapter of the American Association of Legal Nurse Consultants for:

FLORIDA LAWS AND THE NURSE – NEW LICENSURE REQUIREMENT:  Keep Your Patients Safe and Protect Your Nursing License

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this is course is to provide nurses with knowledge of the Florida Laws and Rules that govern the practice of nursing in Florida, while meeting the 2015 requirement for Florida nurse licensure and renewal; and to provide valuable information regarding the structure and purpose of the Florida Board of Nursing Disciplinary Process and how to protect your nursing license by providing excellence in nursing care.

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose and provisions of the Health Professions and Occupations Statue, the Florida Nurse Practice Act and Florida Health Professions Regulations;
  • Describe nursing standards of practice and identify deviations in standards;
  • List the steps in the Florida Nursing Disciplinary Process;
  • List specific sources of nursing practice that have high potential for putting a nursing license at risk of discipline.
  • Describe resources and procedures to protect your nursing license and respond to disciplinary action by the Florida Board of Nursing.

Beginning with the biennium ending in 2015, each Florida Nursing licensee must complete a two hour course on the laws and rules that govern the practice of nursing in Florida.  This program is approved by the Board of Nursing to meet the requirement.

SPEAKERS FOR THIS PROGRAM ARE:

ATTORNEY JOANNE KENNA, RN, JD is an attorney, whose practice encompasses most aspects of health law and nursing law, including the representation of health care providers in professional licensing and credentialing matters, professional board representation, administrative hearings, contracts, licensure issues, corporate matters, transactional matters and litigation.  Ms. Kenna received her juris doctorate degree from Stetson University College of Law.  She has an extensive legal background including medical malpractice defense and nursing home defense.  Prior to law school, Ms. Kenna’s nursing career included at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics included being the head nurse of the cardiac critical care units, a cardiac nursing instructor and cardiac nursing consultant.  She brings a vast amount of experience and expertise to her role in health law.

JUDY A. YOUNG, RN, MSN, MHL is a nurse with over 38 years experience, 20 of which were served in the US Air Force.  Judy is the owner of Florida Legal Nurse Experts, LLC, and works as an independent Legal Nurse Consultant.  Judy’s LNC experience includes defense of mass torts / product liability; expert witness for both plaintiff and defense; and behind the scenes LNC roles for both plaintiff and defense firms.  She currently does medical malpractice defense work.  She also remains clinically active in critical care.  In addition to decades of critical care experience, Judy has been a nursing school director and instructor, and has experience in nursing administration and flight nursing.  She has a master’s degree in nursing from University of Oklahoma, and a master’s degree in health law, from the Sheppard Broad Law Center, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

WHEN: October 28, 2014 – Social (light food) & Networking – 5:30 – 5:45 PM; Chapter Update Meeting 5:45 – 6:00 PM; and Education Program 6:00 – 8:00 PM.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS: 2.0 contact hours, as part of the total hours of continuing education required for initial licensure and biennial renewal, FL Administrative Code 64B9-5.011.  Approved by The Greater Orlando Chapter AALNC, FL Board of Nursing Continuing Education Provider #: 50-13.  LNCCs – This topic qualifies as contact hours that can be applied toward LNCC certification renewal.  If you are submitting this program as contact hours on application for LNCC renewal, report these hours on the application as nursing contact hours.

WHERE:  PLEASE NOTE NEW LOCATION!!!  We are now holding our Greater Orlando Chapter AALNC Meetings at University of Central Florida (UCF).  The street address is UCF Continuing Education, Innovative Center, 3280 Progress Drive, Suite 700, Orlando, FL 32826,  Room 722.

REGISTRATION:  If you plan to attend the meeting in person, PLEASE RSVP by contacting:  info@orlandoaalnc.org.  If you are a guest, please provide your name, address and FL nursing license number for continuing education credit and course completion certificates.

**NEW REGISTRATION INFORMATION:  Members and guests will be able to attend the program in person or “virtually” by logging in online.  Registration to attend the meeting online, will be completed through UCF Continuing Education.  Information regarding the online registration process will be sent ASAP.  The program will also be available for online attendance at any time after the live meeting.

FEES: The meeting / program is free to all Greater Orlando Chapter Members.  There will be a fee for guests:  $25.00 for in person attendance.  Virtual (online) attendance is also free for members, and $25.00 for guests.

Your Professional Nursing License May Be Your Most Valuable Asset; Insure It!

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Suppose you had an item that you really wanted but was very expensive.  Suppose this item cost you $80,000.  Perhaps you took out a loan in order to pay for the item.

Suppose in addition to paying $80,000 you also had to work for four years and contribute four years of your labor to help pay for the item.  For this example, let’s assume your four years of labor is equivalent to an additional $80,000.  Once you can afford the item, you will have invested the equivalent of $160,000 for it.

In order to protect this expensive item, would you insure it?  If this item produced additional income for you, would you insure it?  After considering the price tag of the item, and knowing you have achieved something few others ever do, would you insure it for its full value?

I think almost everyone would answer yes to the questions above.  I certainly would, and I expect you would too.

Yet, I am constantly contacted by nurses who have worked hard for many years, have paid tens of thousands of dollars in tuition, fees, books, and who have sacrificed in order to obtain a nursing degree and nursing license.  Yet, they have not purchased insurance to protect their hard earned licenses.

I am baffled at the number of nurses who come to us in serious trouble because a complaint has been filed against them by a former employer, vengeful co-worker, unhappy patient (or patient’s family), or disgruntled former spouse, boyfriend, girlfriend, etc.  Often the issues are complex.  The legal procedures surrounding administrative complaints and administrative hearings are certainly complicated and confusing.  Yet they do not have the savings to hire an experienced attorney to defend them, and they do not have insurance to cover their defense.

I’m not speaking of professional liability insurance when I am writing this.  I am speaking of insurance to cover your legal defense expenses in the event a complaint is filed against you, jeopardizing your nursing license.  A nursing license with discipline on it is like an old antique painting with a big hole in it; its value is greatly diminished.  A nursing license with disciplinary action is worth a lot less than one that is unblemished.  It is not as marketable as one with no damage on it.

In my experience, nurses are far more likely to have a complaint filed against them resulting in an investigation for possible discipline against their licenses than they are to have a professional liability suit filed against them.  That is why I say that you should purchase nursing liability insurance because of the professional licensure defense coverage it provides;  not because it pays in the event of a law suit.

Furthermore, given that most popular nursing liability insurance (e.g., Nurses Service Organization (NSO) Insurance, CPH & Associates Insurance) is very inexpensive (as little as $10 a month), it is foolish not to be insured.  You have an extremely valuable asset that could easily produce $2 million in income during your lifetime.  Don’t you think a hundred dollars a year is worth paying to help protect it?

This is why I stress buying nursing liability insurance.  Buy it now!  Be sure you are covered for at least $25,000 in professional license defense expense coverage and preferably more, if you can get it.  Buy two policies if necessary.  But buy it!  If you don’t, when you really need it, it will be too late.  You may lose that valuable asset you worked so hard to get.

Comments?

Have you dragged your feet in purchasing professional liability insurance? If so, why? Did reading this blog change your mind? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nurses: Contact The Health Law Firm for Representation in Last Minute Depositions and Hearings

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

We often receive calls from health professionals, including registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners regarding the possibility of representing them on short notice at a Board of Nursing hearing, or at a deposition related to a health care matter.

We Take Last Minute Cases.

Many law firms refuse to represent a client at a hearing unless given plenty of advance notice and preparation time. We, also, always prefer to have sufficient time to obtain documents, review files, interview witnesses, conduct research and prepare, in order to provide our clients the best possible representation. But we realize that in certain cases, the alternative is that the client either gets legal representation on little or no advance notice, or has to suffer the consequences of having no legal representation.

We may do this too, if we believe the case is too complex for us to represent you effectively on such short notice or that any legal representation would be completely futile. However, often this is not the situation.

Administrative Proceedings Can be Very Complex.

In some cases individuals responding to a disciplinary complaint may be fooled into believing that they can effectively represent themselves. They later find out that they have gotten into waters over their heads. Laypersons (meaning, in this case, nonlawyers) who are not aware of such complex matters as the Administrative Procedure Act, the Rules of Civil Procedure, the Rules of Evidence, the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) Rules which the Board of Nursing and the Department of Health (DOH) have enacted, may quickly be perplexed and at wit’s end. Often the individual may only figure this out days or weeks before the final hearing.

The inexperienced individual, or even the inexperienced attorney, in these matters can fall into a number of procedural traps that damage an effective defense. This can be advising the individual to talk to the Department of Health (DOH) investigator, filing an unnecessary answer to an Administrative Complaint, forgetting or not knowing that the client’s right to be free of self-incrimination applies in this type of case and many others.

Procedural Mistakes Can Be Damaging To Your Defense.

Often you will find that merely having an experienced attorney to represent you at a hearing or Board meeting will assist you in avoiding mistakes that damage your case and assist you in preserving your rights for an appeal. In other cases it may even be possible to obtain a change in forum to obtain a better result. For example, many laypersons do not know that if you elect an informal hearing before the Board of Nursing, you have waived your right to prove you are innocent by contesting the facts alleged against you.

What few know or think of in the heat of the moment is that you can ask at the informal hearing before the Board of Nursing to contest the facts, to prove you are not guilty of the charges, and to have the hearing converted to a formal hearing. A formal hearing will be in front of a neutral Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), and you have a great many more procedural rights than you have at an informal hearing. However, we still recommend that you have an experienced health lawyer represent you at a formal hearing.

Available for Deposition Coverage.

In a number of cases, we have been requested to provide local deposition coverage in an area near to one of our offices, when an out-of-town lead counsel is unable to make the trip. If the issues involve health care, we are pleased to be able to assist whenever we can.

Often Professional Liability Insurance Will Pay Legal Fees for Deposition Coverage.

If you are a registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, certified registered nurse anesthetist, licensed practical nurse, nurse midwife or nurse practitioner who has a professional liability insurance policy, especially one with the larger national companies, these often provide legal coverage for depositions. This is primarily because the outcome of the deposition may include having you named as a defendant in a professional liability or negligence lawsuit or having disciplinary charges filed against you.

One of the first things you should do if you receive a subpoena or a notice of a deposition is to contact your professional liability insurance carrier and see if it will pay for an attorney to represent you. For example, Healthcare Providers Service Organization (HPSO), CPH & Associates, Nurses Service Organization (NSO) and many other malpractice insurance companies provide excellent deposition coverage.

The second thing you should do is to call an experienced attorney and schedule a consultation. Even if you cannot afford to retain the services of the attorney for the actual deposition, a consultation may assist you in properly preparing.

Consult With An Experienced Health Law Attorney.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases.

The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners in investigations at Board of Nursing hearings. Call now or visit our website www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you ever had an informal or formal hearing before the Board of Nursing? What was the experience like? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Bill to Expand Authority of Nurses Flatlines During 2014 Legislative Session

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar   in Health Law

The 2014 Legislative Session ended May 2, 2014, with the death of an omnibus health bill. House Bill 7113 would have provided provisions to expand the power of nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians’ oversight. This extension of authority to nurses would no longer require them to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. The bill died after being passed back and forth between the Florida House of Representatives and the Florida Senate numerous times. It could not be resuscitated or kept alive by artificial means.

Currently, Florida nurse practitioners must work under direct supervision of physicians. The bill would have changed the title of nurse practitioners or advanced registered nurse practitioners. These are registered nurses with post-college education, usually a Master’s degree. The denied change would have retitled these health professionals to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). The bill would have also provided nurses the authority to sign documents that currently require a physician’s signature. This would have included the ability to prescribe controlled substances.

There is a total of 17 states in the United States that have adopted similar bills allowing nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians as APRNs.

To read the entire article from Modern Healthcare, click here.

Conflicting Opinions of the Bill.

Proponents of expanding nurse practitioner autonomy argue that the bill would reduce health care costs in addition to solving a critical shortage of primary care physicians. Because of the high enrollment numbers associated with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is anticipated that the need for physicians and health care providers will dramatically increase. Supporters also argue that northerners will be accustom to treatment by nurse practitioners because states such as Connecticut and New York have passed similar bills. They will expect the same level of care when moving to Florida during the winter months.

Opponents of the bill, led by various medical associations, argue the dangers of allocating such power to nurses. They warn that nurses should not have access to prescribing controlled substances without a doctor’s supervision. This argument is defended by highlighting Florida’s constant struggles with high numbers of pill mill busts. The medical associations opposing the bill are passionate in preserving the practice of medicine for the physician. In the end, opponents were granted their wish.

To read more on House Bill 7113, click here for a previous blog.

Even though the bill did not pass this legislative session, we expect this will not be the end of the fight to allow nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Is providing a trained nurse practitioner with greater authority to treat and prescribe really a controversial subject? How do you stand on the topic? What benefits or dangers could arise from providing nurses with greater independence? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

“Health Bill Dies in Florida Legislature.” Modern Healthcare. (May 3, 2014). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20140503/INFO/305039930

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Will Florida Senate Be Pressured into Expanding the Authority of Nurses?

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On April 28, 2014, the Connecticut House of Representatives approved a bill giving nurse practitioners greater autonomy to diagnose and treat patients without doctors’ oversight. Connecticut is one out of 17 states and the District of Columbia to allow nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians. Similar measures are pending in several other states, including Florida.

The Florida House of Representatives passed the bill (CS/CS/HB 7113) on April 25, 2014, that expands the range of practice for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). The bill is expected to be heard in the Florida Senate soon. If passed, this policy shift would likely lead to profound changes in the way health care is practiced in Florida.

Details of the Florida Bill.

Currently, in Florida, nurse practitioners must work under the supervision of physicians. This bill would change the title of what are usually called nurse practitioners or advanced registered nurse practitioners. These are registered nurses who have post-college education, usually a master’s degree. The proposed change would retitle these health professionals to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs).

These nurses would gain new authority under the bill, such as the ability to sign documents that now require a physician’s signature, and the opportunity to earn the title “Independent Advance Practice Registered Nurse” after a certain amount of training and experience. Nurse practitioners would no longer have to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. Another somewhat controversial aspect of the bill is to allow these nurses to gain the authority to prescribe controlled substances.

Increasing Pressure to Pass Similar Bill.

The present Florida bill is being supported as a means to fulfill the anticipated growing need for medical services expected with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Especially in certain segments of the medical population, APRNs are already providing a large amount of this care, and the bill acknowledges and grants the authority for this.

With so many states, especially up in the northeast, agreeing to expand the scope of practice to qualified nurse practitioners, we wonder if this will have an effect on the Senate vote in Florida. Snow birds coming to Florida will be comfortable being treated by nurse practitioners and will expect the same level of care when they come down to the Sunshine State.

Opposition May Kill the Bill.

The opposition to this effort is strong and vocal, with the various state medical associations leading the way. For these groups, the issue is one of preservation of the practice of medicine as the domain of the physician. They are accepting of medical practice by physician “extenders,” but not by “providers” who are not physicians. The members of these opposition groups are a formidable force, respected in their communities and able to make significant political contributions. These are not groups that many legislators would want to rankle.

However, a review of the history of medicine in the United States shows that this is a battle the medical doctors are likely to lose. Similar arguments have been made in the past when other types of health care practitioners have sought legal authority to practice their professions. Immediately coming to mind are osteopathic physicians (D.O.s), chiropractic physicians (D.C.s) and midwives (CMs) to name a few. Some have had to bring antitrust lawsuits to obtain relief.

Be sure to check this blog regularly for updates to this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the bill? Do you think nurse practitioners should have more autonomy? Or do you believe nurse practitioners should be supervised by physicians? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Altimari, Daniela. “State Moves to Give Nurses Independence From Doctors.” The Courant. (April 28, 2014). From: http://www.courant.com/health/connecticut/hc-aprn-bill-20140428,0,7595375.story

Catala, Paul. “Bill Giving Nurses More Authority Passes House.” Highlands Today. (April 28, 2014). From: http://highlandstoday.com/hi/local-news/bill-giving-nurses-more-authority-passes-house-20140429/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nurses Fight for Lawmakers to Relax Laws Requiring Doctors to Oversee Their Work

CCS Blog LabelBy Carole C. Schriefer, R.N., J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

There’s a controversial tug-of-war in the health care industry. According to The Washington Post, in 11 states nursing groups are pushing legislation that would permit nurses with master’s degrees or higher to order and interpret diagnostic tests, prescribe medications and administer treatments without the supervision of a physician. Similar legislation is likely to be introduced in three other states. Currently, each state decides how much supervision nurses must receive from physicians.

This legislation faces strong opposition from physicians, led by the American Medical Association (AMA). This is according to an article in The Washington Post, published on March 24, 2013. Click here to read that article.

The Fight for Autonomy.

According to The Washington Post, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) and other nursing groups are coordinating this legislation effort. These groups are receiving support from consumer advocates and state officials concerned about the possible doctor shortage.

Physicians’ groups are arguing that with little or no supervision, patient care will be compromised, according to a Bloomberg News article. The physicians’ strongest argument is the difference in education between them and advanced practice nurses (APNs). To read the Bloomberg News article, click here.

Difference in Education.

Advanced practice nurses obtain a bachelor’s degree in nursing, then spend between two and three years studying for a master’s degree. A master’s program includes extensive clinical training in addition to class work. One additional year of school is needed to get a Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.) degree.

Physicians obtain a bachelor’s degree, then continue on with four years of medical school. This is followed by at least three years in a residency program.

Laws for Nurse Supervision Differ State-by-State.

Each state regulates how much oversight nurse practitioners must have. According to Bloomberg News, in 16 states, including Colorado, New Hampshire, New Mexico and Washington, nurses can evaluate and diagnose patients, order diagnostic tests and prescribe drugs. Nurses in these states can start a practice or work in a clinic with no physician present.

Florida and Alabama nurses can’t prescribe controlled substances, including medications for pain, insomnia and attention deficit disorder and must have a supervisory agreement in place with a physician supervisor. Their practice is limited by what the physician places in the agreement.

Court Cases of Nurses vs. Doctors.

According to Bloomberg News, physicians in Iowa sued the state in 2010, after it allowed nurses with advanced training to perform a fluoroscopy, which is a radiographic procedure that takes pictures inside the body. The physicians do not believe nurses have the proper training to carry out this procedure. The case is before the Iowa Supreme Court after a lower court sided with the physicians.

Physicians sued the state of Colorado when the governor allowed nurse anesthetists to work without supervision. An appeals court sided with the nurses in 2012. There is a discussion of this case on our blog. Click here to read it.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, pharmacies and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think nurses with advanced degrees should be allowed to practice without the supervision of physicians? Do you think it is necessary for patient care for physicians to be present? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pettypiece, Shannon. “Nurse Practitioners, Doctors in Tug-of-War Over Patients.” Bloomberg Business Week. (March 7, 2013). From: http://www.businessweek.com/printer/articles/100802-nurse-practitioners-doctors-in-tug-of-war-over-patients

Aizenman, N.C. “Nurses Can Practice Without Physician Supervision in Many States.” The Washington Post. (March 24, 2013). From: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/nurses-can-practice-without-physician-supervision-in-many-states/2013/03/24/98b241cc-8745-11e2-999e-5f8e0410cb9d_story.html

About the Authors: Carole C. Schriefer is a nurse-attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Senate Delays Broadening Baker Act Powers for Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants-Calls for a Study

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Florida’s nurse practitioners and physician assistants were hopeful the Senate would vote to allow them to have the authority to order the involuntary commitment of a patient for mental-health evaluation under the Baker Act. However, instead on April 15, 2013, the Children, Families and Elder Affairs Committee passed the formation of a work group to figure out how to improve the more than 40-year-old Florida mental health act.

Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants Want to Broaden Their Powers.

Currently, nurse practitioners and physician assistants can perform an evaluation, but cannot sign off on voluntary or involuntary examination paperwork to admit someone to treatment under the Baker Act. Instead, they must wait for a physician or law enforcement official to perform another evaluation and sign the paperwork. As this process is going on, the patient is free to go, meaning that person may leave the health facility before receiving the care they need.

Work Group Will Measure the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Baker Act.

The work group established by the senate must determine the necessary revisions that need to be made to improve the Baker Act. The group must file a report on their findings by January 14, 2014.

In a Tampa Bay Times article, senators voiced their concerns about the Baker Act, but said they wanted to know exactly what happens after a person is committed and the type of treatment patients receive. In the same Tampa Bay Times article, members of the Florida Association for Nurse Practitioners said the state’s 1,300 nurse practitioners are hoping for a decision this year. To read the entire article from the Tampa Bay Times, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, cardiologists, CRNAs, pain management doctors, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think nurse practitioners and physician assistants should have the right to order involuntary commitment of a patient? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Koff, Rochelle and Stone, Richard. “Senate Committee Calls for Study of Baker Act Instead of Expanding Roles of Nurse Practitioners.” Tampa Bay Times. (April 15, 2013). From: http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/the-buzz-florida-politics/senate-committee-calls-for-study-of-baker-act–instead-of-expanding-role/2115307

Curington, Jennifer. “Measure Would Broaden Powers Under Baker Act.” Orlando Sentinel. (April 11, 2013). From April 11, 2013, issue of Orlando Sentinel, Local News, B3.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.