Florida Nurse Practitioners Fight for Autonomy

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On February 18, 2014, a bill that would expand the authority of nurse practitioners and would allow some to practice independently of physicians was approved by the Florida House Select Committee on Health Care Workforce Innovations. Despite opposition from physician groups, the bill (PCB SCHCWI 14-01) was overwhelmingly approved 13 to 2. However, some of that support might be fleeting.

To read bill PCB SCHCWI 14-01, click here.

Details of the Bill.

Currently, nurse practitioners work under the supervision of physicians. This bill would change the title of what are usually called nurse practitioners, which are registered nurses who have post-college education, usually a master’s degree, to Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). The bill would also apply to specialists, such as certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), certified nurse midwives and certified nurse practitioners.

These nurses would gain new powers under the bill, such as the ability to sign documents that now require a physician’s signature, and the opportunity to earn the title “Independent Advance Practice Registered Nurse” after a certain amount of training and experience. Nurse practitioners would no longer have to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. Another controversial aspect of the bill is to allow these nurses to gain the authority to prescribe controlled substances. Currently, Florida is one of the few states that do not allow this.

Supporters and Opponents Cannot Agree.

Even though the vote drew bipartisan support, several committee members said their support was tentative, and that they wanted to see further debate and amendments.

According to Health News Florida, the President of the Florida Senate reported he opposes the House bill. Many physician groups, including the Florida Medical Association, agree. These groups point out that physicians receive years of additional training to provide care. They also raise the question why students would want to rack up huge amounts of debt to attend medical school if they could do much of the same work as nurse practitioners with less schooling.

Supporters state this bill will help increase access to primary care, particularly in rural areas. Nurse practitioners also state they already provide much of the care that physician groups bill for. It’s argued that similar laws are already in place in a majority of states around the country, according to The News Service of Florida. To read the entire article from The News Service of Florida, click here.

Expanded Scope of Practice for Nurse Practitioners Already Working in Other States.

According to Health News Florida, 23 other states already allow independent practice for nurse practitioners. Also, military services and the Veterans Administration Health System, already allow nurse practitioners to prescribe controlled drugs and allow independent practice. Florida is the only state that prohibits nurse practitioners from prescribing controlled substances.

According to Health News Florida, the issue is not expected to be considered during the upcoming Legislative session. Click here to read the entire Health News Florida article.

Be sure to check this blog regularly for updates to this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced registered nurse practitioners, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the bill? Do you think nurse practitioners should have more autonomy? Or do you believe nurse practitioners should be supervised by physicians? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Saunders, Jim. “Nurse Practitioners Win First Round In Fight Over ‘Scope.'” The News Service of Florida. (February 22, 2014). From: http://www.theledger.com/article/20140222/NEWS/140229772/1374?Title=Nurse-Practitioners-Win-First-Round-In-Fight-Over-8216-Scope

Gentry, Carol. “Senate Pres.: No On Nurses’ Bill.” Health News Florida. (February 24, 2014). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/senate-pres-no-nurses-bill

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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One thought on “Florida Nurse Practitioners Fight for Autonomy

  1. As a psychiatric ARNP here in Florida but licensed in NH and MA, I have my DEA# which I do not utilize here but am glad to have it. I do exactly was the psychiartrist does day to day and when I feel I need his assistance I refer to him or seek his counsel, as I would any colleague in private practice. This battle with the physicians is purely financials in my opinion. I have many physicians who overly prescribe narcotics daily and I am the one who refuces or weans the client off!!! Our pill mill issue started with physicians not nurse practitioners.

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