How Can I Tell Whether or Not My Attorney Knows Anything about Florida Board of Nursing or Disciplinary Cases?

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Hiring an attorney can be intimidating and costly. However, hiring representation for a Florida Board of Nursing or disciplinary case is an investment in your future and career. An experienced attorney is indispensable for preparing and defending your case. But how do you know if your representation is knowledgeable in health law?

Below are some examples of what an experienced attorney will not say to a nurse about his or her Board of Nursing or disciplinary case. Remember, if you hear any of the advice below, the attorney most likely has limited or no experience in this area of legal practice.

1. Your attorney tells you that you can argue your case to the Board of Nursing.

Reason:

You cannot “argue your case” in front of the Board of Nursing. If you are at a hearing before the Board of Nursing, it is because you have requested an “informal hearing.”

If you have requested an “informal hearing” this means you do not dispute any of the facts alleged against you in the Department of Health (DOH) complaint. If you are not disputing the facts, this means you are agreeing that you are guilty. If you are at a hearing in front of the Board of Nursing, you will not be allowed to argue that you are not guilty, and you will not be allowed to call any witnesses or introduce any documents. You are only there for the purpose of determining how much punishment the Board will give you and this is based on guidelines that the Board has previously enacted.

2. If your attorney tells you that he or she does not intend to submit any information or documents for consideration by the Probable Cause Panel (PCP) of the Board of Nursing.

Reason:

Many cases are dismissed by the Probable Cause Panel (PCP) and this is the easiest, most expedient, and least expensive way of winning your case. However, your presentation (written only) that is submitted to the PCP must be direct, concise, directly address the legal issues, and be well organized. It is not advisable to try to prepare this yourself. We often include affidavits from our own expert witnesses that have reviewed the case. If the PCP does not vote in favor of probable cause, the case is dismissed and closed. It is like it never happened. There is no record kept of the initial complaint.

The PCP of the Board of Nursing consists of between two and four members. Some of these can be laypersons with no experience in your area of healthcare. A majority has to vote and decide that there is probable cause. Therefore, if there are only two members, and you convince one that you did not do it, then there is no probable cause.

In my opinion, this is the best and quickest way to win your case, but you must know what you are doing. There are exceptions to every rule.

3. If your attorney tells you to meet with the DOH investigator or to give a statement (written or oral) to the investigator, especially without being present or preparing you.

Reason:

DOH investigators are similar to police. If you give them any statement, this can be used to prove the case against you. In most cases, you never want to do this. Although there may be a rare exception, we strongly advise the client against this in about 99% of the cases we handle.

Even if you believe that you are totally innocent, your former employer, the unhappy patient who reported you, or the DOH prosecuting attorney may be convinced that you are not innocent and recommend that charges are prosecuted against you. Exhibit 1 used against you at a hearing will be your own statement. The first witness the DOH prosecutor will call to testify will be you.

Be smart in such matters. Don’t think you can just explain the case away. Don’t give evidence that can be used against you. It is not required under Florida law, and you cannot be compelled to do this.

4. If your attorney says you should call and negotiate with the DOH attorney, or PRN/IPN case manager.

Reason:

As discussed above, anything you say can and will be used against you. This is one of the main reasons you should retain an experienced attorney: to act as a buffer between you and the legal system, to protect you, and shield you from mistakes you make that could hurt your defense.

Additionally, if your attorney is not much more familiar with the DOH and the PRN/IPN procedures than you are, then why have you hired him or her?

5. If your attorney tells you not to worry about the hearing, you can later appeal.

Reason:

Only about 20% of cases are won on appeal. On appeal, the Court of Appeal is limited to the record of the hearing that was held. You are not allowed to reargue the facts in an appeal. You are limited to arguing about legal errors that were made during the hearing. If you don’t know the law, you are unable to effectively appeal.

6. If your attorney tells you that he or she can represent you during the investigation but is unable to “try” your case at an administrative hearing.

Reason:

Representation only through the PCP hearing stage simply is not enough. An attorney should have sufficient knowledge, experience, and skill to represent you throughout the entire case. If he or she does not, and formal administrative charges are recommended by the PCP, you will then need to retain a completely new attorney who will need time, effort, and legal fees to learn your case in order to properly represent you.

Additionally only an attorney who has experience in litigation cases against the DOH and your professional board will have the credibility and experience to negotiate the most favorable deal for you if you later desire to settle the case.

Consult With An Experienced Health Law Attorney.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases.

The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners in investigations at Board of Nursing hearings. Call now or visit our website www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nurses: Contact The Health Law Firm for Representation in Last Minute Depositions and Hearings

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

We often receive calls from health professionals, including registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners regarding the possibility of representing them on short notice at a Board of Nursing hearing, or at a deposition related to a health care matter.

We Take Last Minute Cases.

Many law firms refuse to represent a client at a hearing unless given plenty of advance notice and preparation time. We, also, always prefer to have sufficient time to obtain documents, review files, interview witnesses, conduct research and prepare, in order to provide our clients the best possible representation. But we realize that in certain cases, the alternative is that the client either gets legal representation on little or no advance notice, or has to suffer the consequences of having no legal representation.

We may do this too, if we believe the case is too complex for us to represent you effectively on such short notice or that any legal representation would be completely futile. However, often this is not the situation.

Administrative Proceedings Can be Very Complex.

In some cases individuals responding to a disciplinary complaint may be fooled into believing that they can effectively represent themselves. They later find out that they have gotten into waters over their heads. Laypersons (meaning, in this case, nonlawyers) who are not aware of such complex matters as the Administrative Procedure Act, the Rules of Civil Procedure, the Rules of Evidence, the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) Rules which the Board of Nursing and the Department of Health (DOH) have enacted, may quickly be perplexed and at wit’s end. Often the individual may only figure this out days or weeks before the final hearing.

The inexperienced individual, or even the inexperienced attorney, in these matters can fall into a number of procedural traps that damage an effective defense. This can be advising the individual to talk to the Department of Health (DOH) investigator, filing an unnecessary answer to an Administrative Complaint, forgetting or not knowing that the client’s right to be free of self-incrimination applies in this type of case and many others.

Procedural Mistakes Can Be Damaging To Your Defense.

Often you will find that merely having an experienced attorney to represent you at a hearing or Board meeting will assist you in avoiding mistakes that damage your case and assist you in preserving your rights for an appeal. In other cases it may even be possible to obtain a change in forum to obtain a better result. For example, many laypersons do not know that if you elect an informal hearing before the Board of Nursing, you have waived your right to prove you are innocent by contesting the facts alleged against you.

What few know or think of in the heat of the moment is that you can ask at the informal hearing before the Board of Nursing to contest the facts, to prove you are not guilty of the charges, and to have the hearing converted to a formal hearing. A formal hearing will be in front of a neutral Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), and you have a great many more procedural rights than you have at an informal hearing. However, we still recommend that you have an experienced health lawyer represent you at a formal hearing.

Available for Deposition Coverage.

In a number of cases, we have been requested to provide local deposition coverage in an area near to one of our offices, when an out-of-town lead counsel is unable to make the trip. If the issues involve health care, we are pleased to be able to assist whenever we can.

Often Professional Liability Insurance Will Pay Legal Fees for Deposition Coverage.

If you are a registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, certified registered nurse anesthetist, licensed practical nurse, nurse midwife or nurse practitioner who has a professional liability insurance policy, especially one with the larger national companies, these often provide legal coverage for depositions. This is primarily because the outcome of the deposition may include having you named as a defendant in a professional liability or negligence lawsuit or having disciplinary charges filed against you.

One of the first things you should do if you receive a subpoena or a notice of a deposition is to contact your professional liability insurance carrier and see if it will pay for an attorney to represent you. For example, Healthcare Providers Service Organization (HPSO), CPH & Associates, Nurses Service Organization (NSO) and many other malpractice insurance companies provide excellent deposition coverage.

The second thing you should do is to call an experienced attorney and schedule a consultation. Even if you cannot afford to retain the services of the attorney for the actual deposition, a consultation may assist you in properly preparing.

Consult With An Experienced Health Law Attorney.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases.

The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners in investigations at Board of Nursing hearings. Call now or visit our website www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you ever had an informal or formal hearing before the Board of Nursing? What was the experience like? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Bill to Expand Authority of Nurses Flatlines During 2014 Legislative Session

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar   in Health Law

The 2014 Legislative Session ended May 2, 2014, with the death of an omnibus health bill. House Bill 7113 would have provided provisions to expand the power of nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians’ oversight. This extension of authority to nurses would no longer require them to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. The bill died after being passed back and forth between the Florida House of Representatives and the Florida Senate numerous times. It could not be resuscitated or kept alive by artificial means.

Currently, Florida nurse practitioners must work under direct supervision of physicians. The bill would have changed the title of nurse practitioners or advanced registered nurse practitioners. These are registered nurses with post-college education, usually a Master’s degree. The denied change would have retitled these health professionals to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). The bill would have also provided nurses the authority to sign documents that currently require a physician’s signature. This would have included the ability to prescribe controlled substances.

There is a total of 17 states in the United States that have adopted similar bills allowing nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians as APRNs.

To read the entire article from Modern Healthcare, click here.

Conflicting Opinions of the Bill.

Proponents of expanding nurse practitioner autonomy argue that the bill would reduce health care costs in addition to solving a critical shortage of primary care physicians. Because of the high enrollment numbers associated with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is anticipated that the need for physicians and health care providers will dramatically increase. Supporters also argue that northerners will be accustom to treatment by nurse practitioners because states such as Connecticut and New York have passed similar bills. They will expect the same level of care when moving to Florida during the winter months.

Opponents of the bill, led by various medical associations, argue the dangers of allocating such power to nurses. They warn that nurses should not have access to prescribing controlled substances without a doctor’s supervision. This argument is defended by highlighting Florida’s constant struggles with high numbers of pill mill busts. The medical associations opposing the bill are passionate in preserving the practice of medicine for the physician. In the end, opponents were granted their wish.

To read more on House Bill 7113, click here for a previous blog.

Even though the bill did not pass this legislative session, we expect this will not be the end of the fight to allow nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Is providing a trained nurse practitioner with greater authority to treat and prescribe really a controversial subject? How do you stand on the topic? What benefits or dangers could arise from providing nurses with greater independence? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

“Health Bill Dies in Florida Legislature.” Modern Healthcare. (May 3, 2014). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20140503/INFO/305039930

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Will Florida Senate Be Pressured into Expanding the Authority of Nurses?

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On April 28, 2014, the Connecticut House of Representatives approved a bill giving nurse practitioners greater autonomy to diagnose and treat patients without doctors’ oversight. Connecticut is one out of 17 states and the District of Columbia to allow nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians. Similar measures are pending in several other states, including Florida.

The Florida House of Representatives passed the bill (CS/CS/HB 7113) on April 25, 2014, that expands the range of practice for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). The bill is expected to be heard in the Florida Senate soon. If passed, this policy shift would likely lead to profound changes in the way health care is practiced in Florida.

Details of the Florida Bill.

Currently, in Florida, nurse practitioners must work under the supervision of physicians. This bill would change the title of what are usually called nurse practitioners or advanced registered nurse practitioners. These are registered nurses who have post-college education, usually a master’s degree. The proposed change would retitle these health professionals to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs).

These nurses would gain new authority under the bill, such as the ability to sign documents that now require a physician’s signature, and the opportunity to earn the title “Independent Advance Practice Registered Nurse” after a certain amount of training and experience. Nurse practitioners would no longer have to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. Another somewhat controversial aspect of the bill is to allow these nurses to gain the authority to prescribe controlled substances.

Increasing Pressure to Pass Similar Bill.

The present Florida bill is being supported as a means to fulfill the anticipated growing need for medical services expected with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Especially in certain segments of the medical population, APRNs are already providing a large amount of this care, and the bill acknowledges and grants the authority for this.

With so many states, especially up in the northeast, agreeing to expand the scope of practice to qualified nurse practitioners, we wonder if this will have an effect on the Senate vote in Florida. Snow birds coming to Florida will be comfortable being treated by nurse practitioners and will expect the same level of care when they come down to the Sunshine State.

Opposition May Kill the Bill.

The opposition to this effort is strong and vocal, with the various state medical associations leading the way. For these groups, the issue is one of preservation of the practice of medicine as the domain of the physician. They are accepting of medical practice by physician “extenders,” but not by “providers” who are not physicians. The members of these opposition groups are a formidable force, respected in their communities and able to make significant political contributions. These are not groups that many legislators would want to rankle.

However, a review of the history of medicine in the United States shows that this is a battle the medical doctors are likely to lose. Similar arguments have been made in the past when other types of health care practitioners have sought legal authority to practice their professions. Immediately coming to mind are osteopathic physicians (D.O.s), chiropractic physicians (D.C.s) and midwives (CMs) to name a few. Some have had to bring antitrust lawsuits to obtain relief.

Be sure to check this blog regularly for updates to this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the bill? Do you think nurse practitioners should have more autonomy? Or do you believe nurse practitioners should be supervised by physicians? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Altimari, Daniela. “State Moves to Give Nurses Independence From Doctors.” The Courant. (April 28, 2014). From: http://www.courant.com/health/connecticut/hc-aprn-bill-20140428,0,7595375.story

Catala, Paul. “Bill Giving Nurses More Authority Passes House.” Highlands Today. (April 28, 2014). From: http://highlandstoday.com/hi/local-news/bill-giving-nurses-more-authority-passes-house-20140429/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

At Board of Nursing Hearing, Each Aggravating Factor Must be Supported by “Competent Substantial Evidence” or Discipline Is reversible on Appeal

The foregoing case summary was prepared by Mary F. Smallwood, Esquire, of The Administrative Law Section of The Florida Bar.

The Department of Health, Board of Nursing (“Board”) filed charges against Fernandez for administering medication to a person who was not his patient. The facts demonstrated that Fernandez had visited a friend in the hospital and administered a drug prescribed for one of his home health care patients. After an administrative hearing, the Board found that five aggravating circumstances justified an upward departure in the penalty provided for the Board’s guidelines to license revocation.

On appeal, the court reversed. While it found support for four of the aggravating circumstances cited by the Board, it held that one of the circumstances was not supported by competent substantial evidence. Specifically, the Board had determined that Fernandez’ actions had caused damage to the patient. The court found the only support for this determination was testimony in the hearing transcript that the court characterized as “speculation.” Since the court concluded that it was unclear whether the Board would have revoked Fernandez’ license absent the determination of damage to the patient, it reversed in part and remanded for the Board to reconsider the penalty without the unsupported aggravating circumstance.

Source:

Fernandez v. Department of Health, 120 So. 3d 117 (Fla. 4th DCA 2013) (Opinion filed August 14, 2013).

About the Author: The foregoing case summary was prepared by Mary F. Smallwood, Esquire, of The Administrative Law Section of The Florida Bar. It originally appeared in the Administrative Law Section Newsletter, Col. 36, No. 2 (Dec. 2013).

Florida Nurse Practitioners Fight for Autonomy

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On February 18, 2014, a bill that would expand the authority of nurse practitioners and would allow some to practice independently of physicians was approved by the Florida House Select Committee on Health Care Workforce Innovations. Despite opposition from physician groups, the bill (PCB SCHCWI 14-01) was overwhelmingly approved 13 to 2. However, some of that support might be fleeting.

To read bill PCB SCHCWI 14-01, click here.

Details of the Bill.

Currently, nurse practitioners work under the supervision of physicians. This bill would change the title of what are usually called nurse practitioners, which are registered nurses who have post-college education, usually a master’s degree, to Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). The bill would also apply to specialists, such as certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), certified nurse midwives and certified nurse practitioners.

These nurses would gain new powers under the bill, such as the ability to sign documents that now require a physician’s signature, and the opportunity to earn the title “Independent Advance Practice Registered Nurse” after a certain amount of training and experience. Nurse practitioners would no longer have to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. Another controversial aspect of the bill is to allow these nurses to gain the authority to prescribe controlled substances. Currently, Florida is one of the few states that do not allow this.

Supporters and Opponents Cannot Agree.

Even though the vote drew bipartisan support, several committee members said their support was tentative, and that they wanted to see further debate and amendments.

According to Health News Florida, the President of the Florida Senate reported he opposes the House bill. Many physician groups, including the Florida Medical Association, agree. These groups point out that physicians receive years of additional training to provide care. They also raise the question why students would want to rack up huge amounts of debt to attend medical school if they could do much of the same work as nurse practitioners with less schooling.

Supporters state this bill will help increase access to primary care, particularly in rural areas. Nurse practitioners also state they already provide much of the care that physician groups bill for. It’s argued that similar laws are already in place in a majority of states around the country, according to The News Service of Florida. To read the entire article from The News Service of Florida, click here.

Expanded Scope of Practice for Nurse Practitioners Already Working in Other States.

According to Health News Florida, 23 other states already allow independent practice for nurse practitioners. Also, military services and the Veterans Administration Health System, already allow nurse practitioners to prescribe controlled drugs and allow independent practice. Florida is the only state that prohibits nurse practitioners from prescribing controlled substances.

According to Health News Florida, the issue is not expected to be considered during the upcoming Legislative session. Click here to read the entire Health News Florida article.

Be sure to check this blog regularly for updates to this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced registered nurse practitioners, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the bill? Do you think nurse practitioners should have more autonomy? Or do you believe nurse practitioners should be supervised by physicians? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Saunders, Jim. “Nurse Practitioners Win First Round In Fight Over ‘Scope.’” The News Service of Florida. (February 22, 2014). From: http://www.theledger.com/article/20140222/NEWS/140229772/1374?Title=Nurse-Practitioners-Win-First-Round-In-Fight-Over-8216-Scope

Gentry, Carol. “Senate Pres.: No On Nurses’ Bill.” Health News Florida. (February 24, 2014). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/senate-pres-no-nurses-bill

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nurses Need to Monitor Their Personal Nursys Profiles

CCS Blog LabelBy Carole C. Schriefer, R.N., J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Nurses, did you know that the status of your license and disciplinary actions taken against you are constantly being tracked by employers? It is actually relatively easy with the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) database, called Nursys. What’s even scarier is employers can sign up for an e-Notify option. This is an e-mail notification system that delivers real-time updates to employers about nurses. The Nursys’ e-Notify option is frequently used by hospitals and medical groups to regulate and screen employees. Click here to read a previous blog on Nursys.

It is imperative, as a nurse, you regulate your own profile regularly for discrepancies. You can do so by clicking here for the Nursys website.

Be Familiar with Nursys and the e-Notify Option.

Nursys is the only national database for license verification, discipline and practice privileges for registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), practical nurses (PNs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), certified nurse practitioners (CNPs), clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) and certified registered nurse anesthetists  (CRNAs). The data on Nursys comes directly from the Florida Board of Nursing and forty-six (46) other state nursing boards. The e-Notify option provides automatic email notifications of licensure status changes and discipline action changes to employers directly. Any institution that employs a nurse can track or check licensure and discipline information at any time.

Employers using Nursys have the ability to view and manage their institution’s nurse employees, including uploading nurse profiles, searching nurses by name, editing nurse information and viewing individual nurse reports.

Nursys Makes it Easy for Employers to Keep Tabs on Nurses.

According to the website, a nurse’s profile on Nursys contains:

-  the nurse’s name,
-  licensed jurisdiction,
-  license type
-  license number,
-  compact status (single state or multistate),
-  license original issue date,
-  license expiration date,
-  discipline against license, and
-  discipline against privilege to practice.

e-Notify will alert subscribers when then following changes are made to a nurse’s record:

-  license status,
-  license expirations, and
-  publicly available disciplinary and alert action and resolution.

Flaws in the Nursys Program.

If you have recently received discipline from the Florida Board of Nursing, or any other state board of nursing, it would be prudent to immediately check this website to verify that any information listed under your profile is accurate.  The website clearly states that it is the nurse’s responsibility to contact the board of nursing to update his or her information.

Our law firm has encountered errors on this database that our client contended caused him to lose employment opportunities. Be responsible for verifying the information on your personal profile.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Did you know about Nursys? What do you think of the database? Do you monitor your profile? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Authors: Carole C. Schriefer is a nurse-attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Kudos to Wyoming State Board of Nursing for its Accurate Information on its Website for Nurses

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

As a nurse, when you are the subject of a complaint that alleges improper conduct or action that could result in discipline against your license, finding correct information regarding the disciplinary process is vital. I’ve recently found that the Wyoming State Board of Nursing (BON) is one of the few nursing board websites that provide accurate information on discipline. On this website, there is information about  nurses’ legal rights, and explanations of the investigation or hearing process, for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs), Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs).

Click here to go to the Wyoming State BON website.

Wyoming State BON Website Provides Information Regarding the Board’s Duty of Reporting to National Practitioner Data Bank.

Information about nursing discipline actions was previously reported to the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) by the Board taking action. The HIPDB collected reports made by federal and state licensing agencies, federal and state prosecutors, and federal and state government agencies that had excluded a practitioner, provider or supplier from their health plan.

On May 6, 2013, the HIPDB officially merged with the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB). The two data banks are now known as the NPDB. To read a blog on how this merger affects you, click here. For more information about NPDB, visit the website: http://www.npdb-hipdb.hrsa.gov/.

Wyoming Website Provides Information Regarding Actions by Office of Inspector General and the Exclusion List.

The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has the authority to exclude individuals and entities from federally funded health care programs (Medicare, Tricare, Medicaid) and maintain a list of all currently excluded individuals and entities. This is called the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE). Anyone who hires an individual or entity that is listed on the LEIE may be subject to civil monetary penalties (CMP).

The OIG has discretion to exclude individuals such as nurses or nursing assistants on a number of grounds, including misdemeanor convictions related to health care fraud (other than Medicare or a state health program); misdemeanor convictions relating to the unlawful manufacture, distribution, prescription, or dispensing of controlled substances; and purposes of disciplinary action by the Board including suspension, revocation or surrender of a license for reasons baring on professional competence or professional performance.

This means that if your license or certificate is suspended, revoked or voluntarily surrendered, your ability to be employed by a health care provider or facility that also receives federal funding, such as Medicare, may be precluded despite the statue of your licensure. In other words, once you are on the exclusion list and have not been taken off even after a reinstatement, you will not be able to be hired as a nurse or nursing assistant by medical facilities receiving federal funds.

To read more on the devastating and far-reaching effects of being excluded, click here.

The Wyoming BON website is the only one I have come across that accurately advises nurses of the collateral consequences of disciplinary action.

Legal Advice for Nurses in These Situations.

I want to commend the Wyoming State BON for including this information on its website. The information provides a great start for nurses with complaints against their licenses.

I’d like to offer up some additional advice. I encourage all nurses to buy insurance to cover license investigation legal defense expenses. Most nursing malpractice insurance policies are very inexpensive and provide excellent coverage. Most contain insurance coverage that will pay for an attorney and other legal defense expenses if you are being investigated or charged with a licensure offense. You should have at least $25,000 in coverage for such investigations and administrative proceedings.

Obtain an Experienced Health Law Attorney Immediately After Receiving Any Notification of an Investigation.

If the BON is investigating a complaint against your license, immediately obtain an experienced health law attorney to represent you throughout the investigation and disciplinary proceedings.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of the information listed on the Wyoming State Board of Nursing website? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nursing Liability and Nursing Malpractice – Part 2

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In this blog I discuss the concept of nursing malpractice. It is the second blog of my two-part series. To read part one, click here.

The Duty of Reasonable Care.

The plaintiff must first show that the nurse had a duty to provide care for the plaintiff. The element of duty is usually straightforward and relatively easy for the plaintiff to prove because once nurses undertake care for their patients they have a clear duty to provide care for that patient in a competent and reasonable manner. Nurses owe a clear duty of care to all of their patients.

Breach of Duty.

When applied to nursing, a breach of a duty occurs when a nurse does, or does not do, what a reasonable nurse would have done under the same, or similar, circumstances. This would mean that the nurse’s care fell below the acceptable standard of care.
The standard of care is a legal concept which reflects how a nurse is expected to act professionally. It incorporates the expectation that nurses conduct themselves with the degree of care, skill and knowledge that reasonably competent nurses would exhibit in a similar situation. It is important to remember that the standard represents a minimum level of practice to which nurses must adhere in order to avoid being found negligent. In other words, nurses do not have to exert heroic efforts to perform their job satisfactorily; they are expected to exercise their good judgment, education and training to the best of their ability, under the circumstances. Nursing care that falls below the acceptable standard of care may result in a medical malpractice lawsuit against the nurse. The standard of care is particular to each field of nursing practice. For instance, orthopedic nurses determine the standard of care for orthopedic nurses.

Injury or Damage.

To prove the element of injury the plaintiff must be able to establish that, in addition to pain and suffering, they have experienced a physical injury, lost money or have an actual reduction in the quality of their life. The injury which the plaintiff suffered will help to determine the monetary damages that will be awarded if the plaintiff succeeds at trial.

Causation.

Causation is often the most difficult element of medical malpractice to prove. In order to prove that the defendant caused their injury, loss or harm, the plaintiff must show that the defendant’s act or omission either caused, or was a substantial factor in causing, harm to the plaintiff. If the defendant proves that the harm would have occurred anyway, irrespective of the defendant’s act or omission, then the negligence action will fail for lack of causation.

Sources for the Standard of Care.

Where do nursing standards come from, and who decides what the standard of nursing care should be in each particular medical malpractice case? The answer is that the sources for nursing practice standards are varied. The court relies on some or all of theses sources to help determine the applicable standard of care in each individual case.
Some of these sources for nursing standards include:

1. Florida Nurse Practice Act, Chapter 464, Florida Statutes;
2. Other Florida Statutes and the Florida Administrative Code;
3. Case law;
4. Principles, guidelines and standards of professional associations such as the American Nursing Association (ANA);
5. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO);
6. Hospital Policies;
7. Standards of Care as testified to by other members of the profession; and
8. Authoritative Nursing Texts and Journals.


Nurse’s Accountability for the Standard of Care.

As a licensed nurse, you are expected to know what the generally accepted standard of care entails and follow that general standard in your daily practice. The policy and procedure manual of your facility should contain nursing care guidelines. However, if the facility you are working in does not adhere or comply with the generally accepted standard of nursing care, then, following the facility’s policies and procedures will not protect you from a charge of malpractice. This is because all nurses are accountable for the nurse’s standard of care. If you are aware that your facility’s policies and procedures are below the generally accepted standard of care, then you should promptly notify your nurse-manager or the risk-control committee of your concerns.

Conclusion.

Over the years nurses are becoming ever more likely targets for plaintiffs, and their attorneys, in medical malpractice cases. It is extremely important for a nurse to know the malpractice laws that encompass the nursing profession. By knowing each element of medical malpractice and the different standards of care that a nurse is held to. A nurse who can adhere to the different standards of care can avoid being held liable for medical malpractice.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nursing Liability and Nursing Malpractice – Part 1

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A wrongful act that causes harm to a person for which the law allows a person to recover is called a “tort.” The most common type of tort is one based on negligence. In order to recover form a tort based on negligence, there are four elements which must be met are that there is an act (or failure to act) in which the following are present: 1) a duty owed by the one performing the act to the one who is harmed; 2) an act (or failure to act) which breaches that duty; 3) actual damage or harm sustained; and causation (in other words, the act or failure to act caused the damage or harm).

Malpractice is just another name for professional negligence. Professional negligence is a tort committed by a licensed professional, in this case a nurse. In order to show nursing malpractice, one must show all of the elements of a negligence tort. The only difference is that in professional negligence, the duty that must be shown is the professional duty that the licensed professional owes to the one injured, in this case, her patient. Accordingly, the duty owed will be one of the nurses professional duties as a nurse.

I will discuss the concept of nursing malpractice further in this two-part blog series.

Defining Negligence.

Negligence is the failure to use such care as a reasonably prudent person would use under similar circumstances.

The law of negligence is part of what is known as “tort” law. The term “tort” originates from the French word meaning “wrong.” The law of negligence therefore deals with injuries or a wrong caused by one person towards another. Most negligence lawsuits are civil, not criminal, cases. A person can be found negligent even though they did not actually intend to harm the inured party, because negligent conduct is the behavior which results in unintended harm.

Defining Medical Malpractice.

Medical malpractice can occur when a health care professional fails to exercise the degree of care that a reasonable health care professional would exercise under the same or similar circumstances. In other words, medical malpractice is negligence committed by a health care professional.

Medical malpractice is a specialized area of law that deals with negligence claims against health care professionals. Medical malpractice is often perceived as conduct which is somehow more egregious than mere negligence. This perception is erroneous because medical malpractice is simply ordinary negligence by a healthcare provider that causes some injury to the patient.

Several years ago nurses were only liable for negligence. Although as nurses exercise more autonomy, their legal liability has changed. Courts in a number of states recognize and identify nursing negligence as a form of medical malpractice.

A Florida lawsuit helps to illustrate this point. In this case, a mother made a routine prenatal visit to the hospital. While in the waiting room the mother complained to the nurse of severe abdominal pain. Over the next hour and a half the mother complained of pain five times, each time she was told that she would have to wait to be examined. When the mother was finally examined her unborn child’s fetal heart rate was only 60 to 70 beats per minute. An emergency cesarean section was performed but the baby was born severely depressed, hypoxic, suffered from severe brain injury and developed seizures within the first hour.

In this case the nurse did not intend to cause harm to the baby or the mother, however the nurses failure to have the patient examined when she complained of severe abdominal pain and her failure to recognize the onset of fetal distress was negligent. A reasonably prudent nurse would have had the patient examined by a physician and recognized signs of fetal distress when the patient complained of acute abdominal pain. The hospital settled this case for $2 million.

The Four Elements of Medical Malpractice.

In order to prevail in a medical malpractice lawsuit, the plaintiff must prove each of these four elements:

1. the defendant owed the plaintiff a duty of reasonable care;
2. the defendant breached her duty;
3. the plaintiff incurred an injury, loss or harm; and
4. the defendant’s acts or omissions caused the plaintiff’s injury, loss or harm.

The plaintiff must prove each of these four elements by a preponderance of the evidence. A preponderance of the evidence means that it is more likely that the defendant committed the medical malpractice than not.

Check the Nursing Law Blog for More.

In the second part of this blog I will go into more detail about the four elements of medical malpractice. Check back next week for that blog.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.