North Florida Nurse Arrested for Neglecting Elderly Patient

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

An investigation led by the Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) ended with an arrest of a north Florida registered nurse (RN), in Suwannee County. The arrest was based on allegations of failing to assess and monitor a 94-year-old patient’s condition. The patient fell and broke her hip and shoulder, and later died.

Click here to see the full press release from the Attorney General’s (AG) Office.

RN Charged with Neglect and Falsifying Hospital Records.

According to the investigation, the RN allegedly failed to care for and monitor the condition of a 94-year-old woman. The RN is accused of falsifying hospital medical records to conceal her failure to provide proper nursing care to the victim.

The RN turned herself in to the Suwannee County Sheriff’s Office. The nurse faces up to five years and two months in prison and a $5,500 fine, according to the AG’s Office.

The AG’s press release states that this case will be prosecuted by the State Attorney’s Office for the Third Judicial Circuit of Florida.

Responding to a MFCU Investigation.

The MFCU is in charge of investigating and prosecuting health care providers suspected of defrauding the state’s Medicaid program. When the unit opens a case against a provider, the first step is usually the issuance of an investigative subpoena, requesting specific patient records.

I previously wrote a blog with tips on how to properly respond to such a subpoena and how to be prepared to defend oneself. Click here to read that blog.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses and Registered Nurses (RNs).

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses and registered nurses (RNs) in MFCU investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Gainesville.com. “Nurse Arrested, Charged with Neglecting Elderly Patient Who Died.” The Gainesville Sun. (June 13, 2012). From: http://www.gainesville.com/article/20120613/articles/120619840

Meale, Jenn. “Attorney General Bondi Announces Arrest of Registered Nurse for Neglecting an Elderly, Disabled Adult.” Florida Office of the Attorney General. (June 13, 2012). From: http://www.myfloridalegal.com/newsrel.nsf/newsreleases/358A1FC528F9A06D85257A1C00729C63

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999. Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

Nurses Beware of a Disciplinary Action Database Called Licensure QuickConfirm

By Christopher E. Brown, J.D.

Nurses, did you know the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) maintains a database of all state disciplinary actions?  This database, called Licensure QuickConfirm, lists all disciplinary actions from the Florida Board of Nursing and forty-six (46) other state boards. It is frequently used by hospitals and medical groups to screen potential employees.

To search the Licensure QuickConfirm list, click here.

Information Comes From the Boards of Nursing.

According to the website, all information listed on the database comes directly from the boards of nursing. A report will contain:- the nurse’s name, - licensed jurisdiction,

- license type

- license number,

- compact status (single state or multistate),

- license original issue date,

- license expiration date,

- discipline against license, and

- discipline against privilege to practice.

Check Your Profile Immediately.

If you have recently received discipline from the Florida Board of Nursing, or any other state board of nursing, it would be prudent to immediately check this website to verify that any information listed under your profile is accurate.  The website clearly states that it is the nurse’s responsibility to contact the board of nursing to update his or her information.

Our law firm recently encountered errors on this database that our client contended caused him lost employment opportunities.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: Christopher E. Brown, J.D. is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Two Recent Rulings Allow Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to Administer Anesthesia Without the Supervision of a Physician

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Recently, courts in both California and Colorado ruled that Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) are now allowed to independently administer anesthesia to patients without the supervision of a physician. In California, the decision came from the First District Court of Appeals on March 15, 2012. In Colorado, an appeals court allowed the same practice on July 19, 2012.

A recent article in American Medical News (AMN) summarizes these cases. To see the entire article, click here.

The Two Cases Come from a Decision Made by Governors to Opt Out of Requiring CRNAs to be Supervised by Physicians.

According to the AMN article, the California and Colorado cases both stem from a decision made by the sates’ governors to opt out of requiring CRNAs to be supervised by a physician. Ordinarily, in order for hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and critical access hospitals to receive Medicare reimbursement under Medicare when a CRNA administers anesthesia, federal regulations require that the CRNA must be supervised by a physician. However, states can opt out if governors consult with the appropriate medical boards and decide that an exemption is in the best interest of the citizens of the state.

The Colorado Medical Society and the Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists Sue.

The Colorado court case states that in 2010, the then-Colorado governor decided to opt out critical access hospitals and 14 rural hospitals in the state. The Colorado Medical Society and the Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists sued contending that the opt out was inconsistent with the state law. The plaintiffs requested the Colorado governor’s decision be blocked by the court.

In 2011, a Colorado district court upheld the exemption. The plaintiffs then appealed.

On July 19, 2012, the Colorado Court of Appeals agreed with the district court’s decision and ruled in favor of independent CRNAs.

Click here to read the entire Colorado Court of Appeals case.

Similar Case in California.

In California, in 2009, the state chose to opt out of requiring physician supervision of CRNAs in Medicare-participating hospitals. The California Medical Association and the California Society of Anesthesiologists sued to block the opt out. The trial court concluded that the opt out was consistent with the law and ruled in favor of independent CRNAs.

On March 15, 2012, the First District Court of Appeals agreed with a lower court’s decision to allow the exemption.

To read the full California Court of Appeals case, click here.

Doctors and CRNAs Disagree on Ruling.

According to the American Medical News article, the regional director of the Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists calls the ruling a safety issue for patients. He believes that by removing a physician’s oversight from the delivery process it diminishes patient care.

Click here to read an opinion article written by a Board Certified Anesthesiologist in Colorado agreeing that unsupervised CRNAs can put patients’ health at risk.

On the other hand, the president of the Colorado Association of Nurse Anesthetist praises the ruling stating, in the article, that research shows no differences in patient morbidity or mortality rates whether or not CRNAs are under a doctor’s supervision.

Click here to read the press release from the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA).

Liability Risks Associated with Being a CRNA.

The administration of anesthesia by a CRNA requires special training and certification. Oversight and availability of an anesthesiologist is required by most organizations. The major risks for CRNAs include the improper placement and maintenance of an airway, failure to recognize significant changes in a patient’s condition and the improper use of anesthetics.

To learn more on the liability risks associated with advanced nurses, read our Nursing Law Manual, by clicking here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing CRNAs.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) in most legal matters, whether concerning licensure, investigations, allegations of impairment or substance abuse, clinical privileges, contracts or employment disputes.   Whether your legal problem involves negotiating a contract or litigating payment issues, we have the experience. We routinely represent nurse practitioners and other health providers in defending allegations of impairment, drug abuse and diversion, as well as in peer review, clinical privileges or certification by a professional association. Medicare payment issues, Medicaid payment issues and insurance payment issues are among those we routinely encounter.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Gallegos, Alicia. “Court Rules Nurse Anesthetists Don’t Need Physician Supervision.” American Medical News. (August 6, 2012). From: http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/08/06/prsa0806.htm

Moss, DO, William. “Anesthesia best Left to Experts” Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists. (August 1, 2012). From: http://csa-online.org/pdfs/Anesthesia_best_left_to_experts.pdf

Shaffer, Scott. “Colorado Appellate Court Uphold Opt Out from Federal Anesthesia Rule.” American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. (July 19, 2012). From: http://www.aana.com/newsandjournal/News/Pages/071912-Colorado-Appellate-Court-Upholds-Opt-Out-from-Federal-Anesthesia-Rule.aspx

Colorado Medical Society v. John Hickenlooper and Colorado Association of Nurse Anesthetist, Colorado Nurse Association and Colorado Hospital Association, No. 11CA1005 COA (July 19, 2012),  available at http://www.courts.state.co.us/Courts/Court_Of_Appeals/Opinion/2012/11CA1005-PD.pdf.

California Society of Anesthesiologists v. California Association of Nurse Anesthetists, No. CPF-10-510191 San Francisco City & County Superior. Ct. (March 15, 2012), available at http://www.courts.ca.gov/opinions/archive/A131049.PDF.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Tips, Pointers and Reminders for Administrative Hearings

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Formal administrative hearings are one of the options provided to a person who has significant (or substantial) interests that will be affected by agency action and who contests the material facts involved in the case.

In this blog, we are usually discussing a hearing involving the professional license of the nurse. In many cases this will be a notice of intent to deny a license application; however, in most cases, it will be based on an administrative complaint filed against the nurse charging the nurse with a violation of the Nurse Practice Act or other misconduct.

A formal administrative hearing is the only chance which is provided to a nurse to actually challenge the facts of the case and show, for example, that she is not guilty of the charges alleged against her. The formal administrative hearing is the only proceeding in which the nurse against whom the complaint is filed (called the “respondent”) may confront the evidence against her (documents and witnesses) and introduce her own evidence (including her own testimony, if desired), to show she is not
guilty of the charges.

Formal administrative hearings are governed by the Florida Administrative Procedure Act (APA), Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. Please see the separate chapter in this Manual on the Administrative
Procedure Act.

Our Tips, Pointers and Reminders for Administrative Hearings.

This is a partial checklist of some of the matters we check in preparing for administrative hearings. It is not complete and it may not apply in every case. It should serve as a reminder of certain issues that
should be checked up on prior to the actual date of the hearing.

1. If you need one, make sure to notify the ALJ or make a reservation for a televison monitor, VCR/DVD, projector, screen, or conference phone early (when the original order setting the hearing is received), and follow up with a confirmation letter to the hearing coordinator.

2. Make sure all witnesses testifying have been listed in your answers to interrogatories, and if not, amend your answers to include all witnesses. Also, check the witness list for the pre-hearing stipulation.

3. File all discovery responses/answers immediately when received, with the Clerk of the Division of Administrative Hearings, using a notice of filing, so these will be in the official record. If there is discovery not answered, do a motion to compel (except with requests
for admissions).

4. Some administrative law judges have ceratin procedures they require or certain things they don’t allow in hearing procedures. It is a good idea to check with someone else who has appeared before the ALJ to find out if that ALJ has any.

5. Go onto the Division of Administrative Hearing website, search for and review the last few recommended orders (ROs) and Final Orders on your administrative law judge ahead of time. This will give you an idea of what the administrative law judge is like and how he/she has ruled on various issues in the past. The DOAH website is (www.doah.state.fl.us). Go to case search, put in ALJ’s name and agency name (for example DOH) to obtain Recommended Orders on similar cases.

6. On the day of the hearing, get to the room at the final hearing site early to organize and re-set the room if necessary, to choose where you want to sit. Rearrange the room, if necessary to have a proper hearing setting to create one large conference able in the middle, as most administrative law judges seem to prefer this.

7. Investigation reports are inadmissible as hearsay. You must object to them if the DOH attorney attempts to introduce one.

8. Also, settlement negotiations (including the transcript or minutes of Board meeting at which a settlement stipulation was considered, and any statements made by the respondent or anyone else in support of it are inadmissible, per Rule 90.408 (civil) and Rule 90.410
(criminal) of the Rules of Evidence.

9. Affidavits are considered hearsay evidence, but since this is an administrative hearing the ALJ may allow one or more into evidence, if it is being used to corroborate previously admitted evidence.

10. If you want to introduce an affidavit at hearing and you have the witness who made the affidavit available, have the witness present, have the witness take the stand and testify from the affidavit.

11. Bring a copy of the most recent DOAH court docket for case, to be able to prove that a document was or was not filed.

Although not directly applicable to a formal administrative hearing involving a nursing license case, the following checklist which we use for formal hearings involving Medicaid benefits, may also be useful to you.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses Administrative Hearings.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in administrative hearings, depositions, Department of Health investigations, before the Board of Nursing, and in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.